Mental health awareness – Il Faro Della Vita http://ilfarodellavita.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:23:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ilfarodellavita.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Mental health awareness – Il Faro Della Vita http://ilfarodellavita.com/ 32 32 Congressman Neguse Provides Safe Housing and Mental Health Services to Wildlands Federal Fighters https://ilfarodellavita.com/congressman-neguse-provides-safe-housing-and-mental-health-services-to-wildlands-federal-fighters/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/congressman-neguse-provides-safe-housing-and-mental-health-services-to-wildlands-federal-fighters/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 03:02:19 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/congressman-neguse-provides-safe-housing-and-mental-health-services-to-wildlands-federal-fighters/ WASHINGTON – Congressman Joe Neguse, co-chair of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus, has passed two proposals by the United States House of Representatives. These two laws, called the Housing Our Firefighters Act and the Care for Our Firefighters Act, each aim to meet the needs of many federal forest fighters. The Housing for Our Firefighters Act […]]]>

WASHINGTON – Congressman Joe Neguse, co-chair of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus, has passed two proposals by the United States House of Representatives.

These two laws, called the Housing Our Firefighters Act and the Care for Our Firefighters Act, each aim to meet the needs of many federal forest fighters.

The Housing for Our Firefighters Act establishes a housing allowance for federal wildland firefighters, hired more than 50 miles from their primary residence, and the Care for Our Firefighters Act would ensure mental health programs for federal wildland firefighters. including a mental health awareness campaign, peer support network, expansion of the critical incident stress management program, mental health leave and ensuring that mental health professionals knowledgeable about trauma are available to provide their services.

Congressman Neguse introduced the two provisions as stand-alone measures and as amendments to the Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Act and plans to introduce comprehensive legislation to revise pay soon. , benefits and classification of federal firefighters.

This increase in public demand and the expectations placed on wildland firefighters to respond to ever increasing wildfires is only expected to increase exponentially in the years to come. The current federal forest fire workforce are understaffed, overworked and suffering from various mental health issues, suicides, high divorce rates and high incidence of cancer and cardiovascular disease that they do not have the appropriate resources to deal with .

“Our federal firefighters, many of whom are veterans, are just not getting the support they need. As the impacts of climate change worsen, forest fire seasons become increasingly intense and long, and it is essential that we provide the support necessary to equip our firefighters and support this highly skilled profession, ”said Congressman Joe Neguse.

Neguse added that the provisions are just the first step among many in helping federal firefighters get the support they need.

“Grassroots Wildland Firefighters support these amendments and thank Representative Neguse for these first steps to help reduce the housing insecurity and mental health issues prevalent among our federal firefighters. We are grateful for the long-awaited Congressional leadership that Representative Neguse is taking in addressing the classification, compensation and benefits, as well as the overall health and welfare of our Federal Wildland, Fighting workforce, ”said declared Grassroots Wildland Firefighters.

Every major wildfire in the United States relies on federal wildland fire response with federal wildland firefighters and the vital services provided by their specialist teams to protect life and property. The Forest Service employs the majority of the nation’s wildland firefighters, more than 10,000 people, fighting wildfires in all 50 states and internationally. In addition, the federal government provides advanced skill units such as Hotshot Crews, Smokejumpers, Rappellers, Helitack Crews, and Wildland Fire Modules, as well as the engines and crews it employs at higher levels than its non-federal counterparts.

Forest firefighters are classified as “forest technicians” paid an hourly wage of $ 13.45 at the GS-3 level and often do not receive adequate health benefits or housing while on the job.

Firefighters across the country also kill themselves 30 times more often than the public and have a 30% increased risk of cardiovascular disease and 43% increased risk of lung cancer.

Read the Act respecting the housing of our firefighters HERE.

Read the Act respecting the care of our firefighters HERE.


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Association between obesity and mental health https://ilfarodellavita.com/association-between-obesity-and-mental-health/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/association-between-obesity-and-mental-health/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 16:07:52 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/association-between-obesity-and-mental-health/ Posted on Sep 25, 2021 | Author Dr Bhavna Barmi You might wonder if obesity causes mental health problems or if mental health problems cause obesity. The nature of the link between obesity and mental health varies from individual to individual. Emotional distress can lead to overeating in some people. Food can be used to […]]]>

Posted on Sep 25, 2021 | Author Dr Bhavna Barmi

You might wonder if obesity causes mental health problems or if mental health problems cause obesity. The nature of the link between obesity and mental health varies from individual to individual.

Emotional distress can lead to overeating in some people. Food can be used to deal with stress, which can lead to obesity and excessive weight gain. Others may experience emotional anguish because of their weight.

Being overweight can make people feel bad about themselves. Overweight people may face stigma or discrimination from others. These events can have a negative effect on a person’s self-esteem.

People who are obese may find it more difficult to participate in enjoyable activities, which makes it harder to deal with negative feelings. Obesity is associated with a higher number of physical health problems and suffering, which can lead to increased stress.

Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder.

Anxiety

Anxiety is linked to increased activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of the brain. Among other things, the HPA axis plays a role in digestion and emotional control. It can cause increased hunger when not working properly, which can lead to weight gain and obesity. Anxiety and obesity have a number of risk factors, such as a history of childhood abuse and personality traits such as neuroticism, sensitivity to criticism, and the desire to avoid stress.

Depression

Studies on the link between depression and obesity have found that depression can sometimes lead to obesity and vice versa. Food can be used to deal with negative feelings in those who are already suffering from depression, which can lead to excessive weight gain over time. Feelings of depression can cause a lack of energy and enthusiasm to engage in physical activity, which can lead to weight gain.

The stress of managing obesity and its effects on life can lead to unpleasant sensations, which can turn into depression in people who already have it.

Bipolar disorder

There is no established cause for the association between bipolar disorder and obesity. People with bipolar disorder, like those with other mental illnesses, may turn to diet as a coping mechanism. Another possibility is that certain mood stabilizers, as well as drugs used to treat bipolar disorder, may have side effects such as increased hunger and weight gain. Therefore, people who take these drugs for a long time are more likely to become obese.

The association between obesity and mental illness is influenced by a wide range of factors. Obesity takes a toll on physical and mental health, and due to poor self-image and physical illnesses, it can progress to a full-blown mental illness.

Due to the side effects of medications, hormonal imbalances, and behavioral problems caused by psychiatric illnesses, psychiatric disorders can lead to obesity. While general healthy eating guidelines are essential, they may not be enough to bring about changes in this particular group.

Additional training is often required for patients to better understand the relationship between diet and mood and to make small but substantial changes. Improving food intake and relationship to food is likely to lead to decreased weight gain and improved mental health, as well as better medication adherence.

STIGMA AROUND MENTAL HEALTH

A stigma is a negative judgment that is associated with a certain characteristic or condition, develops socially, and is not specific to a person. Stigma is a complex phenomenon which has political and social influence and which also affects political, social and individual environments.

The stigma associated with mental health is widely endorsed by the general public, the media and society in general. Social pressure to be “normal” manifests itself in unhealthy mental health stigmas that make it difficult to accept any mental illness that you have or that someone else has.

Mental health issues are very common as our lives get busier and hectic every day. It is becoming increasingly difficult for people to find the time to take care of their physical and mental health.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2015, about one in five Indians suffered from depression once in their lifetime, which equates to around 200 million people. However, due to the stigma associated with mental illness, lack of awareness and limited access to services, only 10-12% of these people can seek help.

Social stigma around mental health is so common because there is no clear understanding of the importance of mental health care and until very recently little awareness was being disseminated about it.

Even after the recent wave of mental health awareness programs and conferences, what is needed to remove social stigma is the effort to change underlying beliefs and myths about mental health.

These stigmas have an impact in two ways, public stigma and self-stigma.

Public stigma is the reaction of the general population to mental illness, and self-stigma is the prejudice that people with mental illness hold against themselves. These are all internalized beliefs that are rooted in social reality.

People with mental illness are seen as risky, vicious, attention-seeking and a handicap to society. But in reality, they are more likely to be hurt, assaulted and hurt by society. People with mental health issues are also believed to be weak.

However, it’s important to understand that in a society that stigmatizes mental health, it takes a lot of courage to come to terms with your problem, talk about it, and seek help.

Another common misconception is that mental illness lasts forever and therapy is a waste of time, but studies have shown that 70-90% of people with a positive prognosis show significant improvement in their mental health after therapy. and processing.

The worst of these social stigmas is the belief that young individuals, individuals with money and power cannot suffer from mental illnesses like anxiety or depression because they are too young or have all. However, mental health issues have a variety of causes and factors associated with them, such as unhealthy parenthood and childhood trauma, or loneliness.

People with mental illness face not only their own symptoms, but also the prejudices and stereotypes that result from these misconceptions. Because of both, people with mental illness are deprived of the opportunities that define a quality life: good jobs, safe housing, good health care, and membership in a diverse group of people.

In addition, access to mental health care in India is low in both urban and rural areas. Qualified professional training is not the norm. Insurance does not make mental health care affordable. Understanding of the difference between psychological attention and psychiatric care is very limited, and the emphasis is more on drugs and the use of old and primitive methods to treat mental health problems.

Despite progress on paper and some progress in practice, there remains a pathetic lack of social and reconstruction infrastructure to deal with this problem, which suppresses the demand for care. Social stigma and discrimination persist in society and cultures. They remain the biggest barriers to using mental health services in our country and around the world.


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Take time from Kōrero / mā Te Kōrero, Ka Ora – Art exhibit drops on Mental Health Awareness Week https://ilfarodellavita.com/take-time-from-korero-ma-te-korero-ka-ora-art-exhibit-drops-on-mental-health-awareness-week/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/take-time-from-korero-ma-te-korero-ka-ora-art-exhibit-drops-on-mental-health-awareness-week/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 00:13:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/take-time-from-korero-ma-te-korero-ka-ora-art-exhibit-drops-on-mental-health-awareness-week/ Friday, September 24, 2021, 12:13 p.m.Press release: Urban Art Foundation Works by some of New Zealand’s most famous artists to be exhibited across the country as Urban Art Foundation (UAF) and Mental Health Foundation (MHF) draw attention to Mental Health Awareness Week , which runs from September 27 to October 3. This year’s Mental Health […]]]>

Works by some of New Zealand’s most famous artists to be exhibited across the country as Urban Art Foundation (UAF) and Mental Health Foundation (MHF) draw attention to Mental Health Awareness Week , which runs from September 27 to October 3.

This year’s Mental Health Awareness Week is themed on the importance of having a little conversation / kōrero for our mental well-being: take the time to kōrero / mā te kōrero, ka ora – a little conversation can do a long way.

Mental Health Foundation Executive Director Shaun Robinson said of the UAF exhibition: “Art can be a fantastic tool to spark conversations between people. It’s the little, everyday conversations that make us understand each other better – and those conversations can make a big difference to our mental health, too. That’s the focus of this year’s Mental Health Awareness Week –
take the time to kōrero. We hope people take a moment to pause, reflect and engage with these works of art when they encounter them on the move – we can give our well-being a real boost when we take just a moment to notice our surroundings.

UAF Creative Director Andrew Hagen said: In isolation
The exhibition, which took place after lockdown last year, was very well received. From there, one thing became clear: art creates conversation. ‘Take Kōrero’s time is an attempt to contribute to Mental Health Awareness Week by showing art that not only inspires people, but also evokes communication and connection.

“We are fortunate to have benefited from the invaluable assistance of major art collections, including the Waikato Museum, the New Zealand Portrait Gallery, the Fletcher Trust Collection and the Chris Parkin Collection. Many of the artists in this exhibit are known names, including Rita Angus, Don Binney, Robin White, and Jacqueline Fahey.

Ms. Sandra Schmidt (AThR ANZACATA), a Wellington-based licensed arts therapist, said of the exhibit: “Engaging with the arts, either by being part of the audience or by creating and creating is an invitation to connect with oneself. even and with others. Creating, in particular, allows you to encounter other aspects of yourself. It’s like looking in a mirror who is kind to you. It creates a unique reflection that is more than the sum of its parts! Creating and engaging with the arts is a positive interaction – this is not to deny or belittle but to give to yourself and the community around you.

Courtesy of oOh! Media NZ, the exhibit will be featured on digital billboards in streets and malls across New Zealand. oOh! media has already partnered with the UAF to present numerous art exhibitions to the general public.

Oh! Media NZ Managing Director Nick Vile commented, “This is another fantastic collaboration aimed at raising awareness of an extremely important national issue. We are very proud of the work we do with Urban Art Foundation, and this is yet another example of how art can raise awareness and hopefully encourage conversation among Kiwis as they move through their homes. communities and see these works in the street.

The exhibition begins this Monday, October 27 and lasts six weeks. It will be featured on various oOh! Media digital billboards in bus shelters and retail malls nationwide.

© Scoop Media


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Health organization receives $ 625,000 for mental health training https://ilfarodellavita.com/health-organization-receives-625000-for-mental-health-training/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/health-organization-receives-625000-for-mental-health-training/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 10:40:05 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/health-organization-receives-625000-for-mental-health-training/ The Arkansas Rural Health Partnership received $ 625,000 to address growing mental health issues. The money will be used to provide mental health awareness training to college students and staff in the area. The training will be delivered in coordination with Southeast Arkansas College, Phillips Community College and the University of Arkansas at Monticello, according […]]]>

The Arkansas Rural Health Partnership received $ 625,000 to address growing mental health issues.

The money will be used to provide mental health awareness training to college students and staff in the area.

The training will be delivered in coordination with Southeast Arkansas College, Phillips Community College and the University of Arkansas at Monticello, according to a press release.

Mental Health and Addiction Services Administration funding is designed to provide targeted training to people to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health crises and to connect people to needed resources.

ARHP is a nonprofit organization of 14 member rural hospitals, including sites in Southeast Arkansas.

The agency received one of 145 SAMHSA awards this month, the statement said.

SAMHSA funding will help ARHP staff deliver mental health first aid training, an evidence-based model, to professionals serving students, faculty, administrators, staff, coaches, staff health and athletes.

People in need of care will be referred to behavioral health services throughout the region.

Training and services will be provided in these Southeastern Arkansas counties: Jefferson, Lonoke, Prairie, Monroe, Lee, Phillips, Arkansas, Lincoln, Desha, Chicot, Drew, Bradley, Ashley, Union, Columbia, Ouachita , Dallas, Cleveland and Grant.

The funding is designed to provide targeted training to individuals to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health crises and connect them with the necessary resources, the statement said.

Amanda Kuttenkuler, director of the ARHP mental health awareness project, explained the expectations.

“The project will seek to achieve two goals: (1) increase the capacity of local college and healthcare partners to support and respond appropriately to the mental health needs of students, and (2) increase the number of students. students prepared in evidence. based on programs to recognize the mental health needs of their peers and connect them with the necessary resources, ”said Kuttenkuler. “Over the next five years, we will have the opportunity to train over 6,000 local students and those who serve students in mental health awareness and suicide prevention.” ARHP Executive Director Mellie B rid ewe ll discussed the benefits of the program.

“Our office has received many calls telling us that this training has already saved lives,” said Bridewell. “Imagine the impact: train one person and you get an incredible ripple effect. We are delighted to have further opportunities to share this information with local students and those who serve students in the region, especially as covid-19 has recently increased this need. Keith Pinchback, Ed.D., is Chancellor of Phillips Community College, one of the sites promoting the project.

“On behalf of Phillips College, we are delighted to be participating as one of three local partner colleges in this five-year project. Save Our Students will approach the challenge of growing student mental health issues from two critical perspectives: by training faculty, college administration and staff, as well as students themselves in awareness raising. mental health and suicide prevention, ”Pinchback said.

In 2016, ARHP conducted community health needs assessments for its member rural hospitals. The data unanimously prioritized behavioral health as the top concern.

ARHP members include Ashley County Medical Center, Baptist Health Stuttgart, Bradley County Medical Center, Chicot Memorial Medical Center, Dallas County Medical Center, Delta Memorial Hospital, DeWitt Hospital and Nursing Home, Drew Memorial Health System, Helena Regional Medical Center , Jefferson Regional Medical Center, Magnolia Regional Medical Center, McGehee Hospital, Medical Centers of South Arkansas and Ouachita Regional Medical Center as well as two federally qualified health systems (Mainline Health Systems and Mid Delta Health System).


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New Resources to Help Connecticut Residents in Need https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-resources-to-help-connecticut-residents-in-need/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-resources-to-help-connecticut-residents-in-need/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 19:18:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-resources-to-help-connecticut-residents-in-need/ September is National Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Together with our state and community partners, United Way of Connecticut is committed to raising public awareness of important resources for mental health and suicide prevention. New funding from the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) and the Department of Children and Families (DCF) will […]]]>

September is National Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Together with our state and community partners, United Way of Connecticut is committed to raising public awareness of important resources for mental health and suicide prevention. New funding from the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) and the Department of Children and Families (DCF) will allow United Way of Connecticut 211 to double the size of the crisis team and thereby ensure increased availability for help Connecticut residents in need.

“If you’re looking for help, information, or access to mental health resources, our 211 Connecticut Crisis Response Team is available 24/7,” said Lisa Tepper Bates, President. and CEO of United Way of Connecticut. “The crisis team offers help to callers in emotional distress or expressing suicidal thoughts. This support is more important than ever, given the ongoing stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Research from the Kaiser Family Foundation indicates that mental health issues have increased by up to 300% nationwide as a result of the pandemic and its impacts.

“Our state has come together to build a robust system dedicated to suicide prevention. The United Way of Connecticut 211 Crisis Team stands ready to respond with empathy and support to those in difficulty and serves as a gateway to our state’s mental health resources and mobile response teams, working in close coordination. with DMHAS and DCF, ”said the Lieutenant Governor. Susan Bysiewicz.

“As our state strives to double its commitment to suicide prevention and mental health services, particularly at this stressful time as the national response to the pandemic continues, we are pleased to work with 211 to expand the resources available to help Connecticut residents in need, ”said Acting Commissioner Nancy Navarretta of the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

“The support of the 211 crisis team for children and youth in need of support, as well as their parents and caregivers, is of crucial importance in our efforts to ensure that help is always available – any time of the day, any day of the week. We are excited about our ongoing ongoing discussions with United Way of Connecticut to expand our work to go upstream on mental health – and expand our work with young children and their caregivers to promote mental health awareness and improve knowledge. on self-care, ”said Commissioner Vannessa. Dorantes, Department of Children and Families.

“We are proud to partner with the Ministry of Children and Families, through which we serve as an entry and triage point for mobile crisis intervention services for youth, and through our collaboration with the Ministry of Mental Health and Addiction Services, for which we serve as the adult telephone intervention and options network, or ACTION line, ”said Tanya Barrett, Senior Vice President of 211 Health and Human Services at United Way of Connecticut.

In 2020, 33% (12,507) of all calls handled by 211 Contact Specialists were from callers in crisis. In 91% of adult emergency calls, callers reported that their state of seizure decreased while on the phone with a 211 contact specialist. Less than 1% of callers required active rescue or 911 emergency medical intervention.

The Connecticut 211 Contact Center is accredited by the American Association of Suicidology for crisis response and handles calls from Connecticut to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-SUICIDE and will answer calls from Connecticut to the new line. 988 mental health and suicide prevention. .

Suicide is preventable. We encourage anyone with anxiety, depression, or experiencing mental health issues to proactively engage with existing support resources, including through 211.

For more information on mental health resources in Connecticut, visit the Mental Health page on the 211 Connecticut website (www.211ct.org).

Additional resources include:

Youth and Elementary

  • Gizmo’s Pawesome Guide to Mental Health: Learn more about an innovative upstream approach to supporting youth mental health and well-being: https://www.gizmo4mentalhealth.org.

Teens and college

Adults

Elders

Help is available!

If you or a loved one is struggling, remember that you are not alone. Dial 2-1-1 anytime, day or night, to speak to a trained professional who cares about your safety and well-being and is ready to listen and assist you.


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Cyclist completes ride across Canada to raise awareness in Manitoba community about mental health crisis https://ilfarodellavita.com/cyclist-completes-ride-across-canada-to-raise-awareness-in-manitoba-community-about-mental-health-crisis/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/cyclist-completes-ride-across-canada-to-raise-awareness-in-manitoba-community-about-mental-health-crisis/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 01:52:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/cyclist-completes-ride-across-canada-to-raise-awareness-in-manitoba-community-about-mental-health-crisis/ WINNIPEG – A cyclist who has traveled across Canada on horseback to raise awareness about the youth mental health crisis in a Manitoba community has returned home, but says his journey is far from over. Rylee Nepinak arrived in Winnipeg on Tuesday afternoon after a bike ride across the country. The 25-year-old Sagkeeng First Nation […]]]>

WINNIPEG –

A cyclist who has traveled across Canada on horseback to raise awareness about the youth mental health crisis in a Manitoba community has returned home, but says his journey is far from over.

Rylee Nepinak arrived in Winnipeg on Tuesday afternoon after a bike ride across the country. The 25-year-old Sagkeeng First Nation cyclist started his race in Vancouver in August.

He traveled to Halifax on Monday, greeted by youth from the Tataskweyak Cree Nation.

“My race is over, but my journey itself is not completely over. I still have promises to keep to myself and to the Tataskweyak Cree Nation, ”said Nepinak.

“But the fact that the ride itself is over, I feel overwhelmed with joy and relief and just humbled to have a new family.”

In July, the Tataskweyak Cree Nation declared a state of emergency due to recent suicides in the community. Nepinak decided to start the trek across the country to raise awareness of the mental health crisis in Tataskweyak and other communities across Canada.

“We have to understand that this is not just happening in the Tataskweyak Cree Nation. This is also happening in our cities. This is happening in many of our northern communities, if not all, ”he said.

“We need our people to see their basic needs met – adequate education, clean water and above all support for our country.

Tataskweyak Cree Nation Chief Doreen Spence said the community is grateful for the work done by Nepinak.

“For a complete stranger to do this, he never entered our community, yet he entered this race,” she said. “I can’t wait for him to come to our community and meet the rest of the members of our community because I know everyone just wants to meet him and thank him.”

Nepinak said he raised around $ 27,000 during the ride. He plans to bring the money to the Cree Nation of Tataskweyak and organize a sharing circle and town hall for young people.

“Young people are going to be the ones who decide how to spend it,” he said. “I don’t want this to be the only time I’m here, I want it to be continuous work moving forward.”

Anyone with mental health issues can call ACSM at 204-982-6100. If you are in a crisis, you can call Klinic’s 24-hour crisis line at 204-786-8686 or 1-888-322-3019.

Other supports for mental health in Manitoba can be found online.


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Teacher helps create curriculum for GPB mental health series https://ilfarodellavita.com/teacher-helps-create-curriculum-for-gpb-mental-health-series/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/teacher-helps-create-curriculum-for-gpb-mental-health-series/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/teacher-helps-create-curriculum-for-gpb-mental-health-series/ Posted: Sep 21, 2021 / 12:00 p.m. EDT / Update: Sep 21, 2021 / 10:07 AM EDT AUGUSTA, Georgia (WJBF) – A Georgian teacher helped write part of the program for a new series on Georgian public broadcasting for use in schools. Adam Kowalczyk is a professor at Davidson Fine Arts. He was involved in […]]]>

Posted:
Update:

AUGUSTA, Georgia (WJBF) – A Georgian teacher helped write part of the program for a new series on Georgian public broadcasting for use in schools.

Adam Kowalczyk is a professor at Davidson Fine Arts. He was involved in the creation of the program for two of the eight episodes of Hope Givers. The series is intended for use in classrooms across the country.

This is a series of videos with attached worksheets and study guides focusing on topics such as bullying, suicide awareness, and mental health and wellness.

“And it’s really aimed at middle and high school age students, just to show them that they’re not alone and that other kids and students have been through things like maybe they’re going through.”

Kowalczyk said it meant a lot to him to be involved.

“It was wonderful. I jumped at the chance as soon as I… I didn’t know anything about it and said I just needed… I just felt a call. The kids have need help and advice and i think just being able to contribute to this work i immediately said i have to be a part of it.

The eight-episode series launched Monday morning, but a virtual premiere takes place Tuesday night at 7:00 a.m.

CLICK HERE for more information on Hope Givers.


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New initiative focuses on farmers’ mental health | New https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-initiative-focuses-on-farmers-mental-health-new/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-initiative-focuses-on-farmers-mental-health-new/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/new-initiative-focuses-on-farmers-mental-health-new/ Jamie Robertson once saw a family farm disappear. His parents’ poultry farm in Gilford delivered eggs throughout central New Hampshire, but when the market turned in the 1980s, they were eventually forced to sell. It wasn’t the end of farming for Robertson, who is now a fourth-generation farmer at Bohanan Farm in Hopkinton, which he […]]]>

Jamie Robertson once saw a family farm disappear. His parents’ poultry farm in Gilford delivered eggs throughout central New Hampshire, but when the market turned in the 1980s, they were eventually forced to sell.

It wasn’t the end of farming for Robertson, who is now a fourth-generation farmer at Bohanan Farm in Hopkinton, which he runs with his wife. His three sons, who have decided to return to the farm, are the fifth generation. And now they are doing all they can to make this continue. This included tough business decisions like selling the right to develop the farm by placing it in a conservation easement and reducing the herd of 250 mature cows ten years ago to a herd of 120 now.

Managing a family farm is no easy task. Profit margins are low at best, the hours are long, and the debt incurred by some farmers to finance their operations can be overwhelming. Through it all, there is the constant pressure to potentially lose what several generations have worked hard to build. The toll on mental health – often a taboo conversation among farmers – can be significant.

“The stress that’s really difficult for most of the dairy farms that are left is that these are multigenerational farms, and no one wants the farm to end up under their watch,” said Robertson. The way agriculture in the state has changed over the course of his life has been “heartbreaking,” he said.

Family farms have been unable to compete with industrial agriculture in other parts of the country and the world. Robertson recalls a time in the 1940s and 1950s when there were more chickens per square mile in Hillsborough County than anywhere in the world. Those days are over.

“When it comes to mental health, farmers are like the rest of the world and quite skeptical about researching this,” said Robertson, who, like others in the business, describes farmers as a lot. intensely independent.

A 2020 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that nationwide, farmers are among the occupational groups with the highest suicide rates. Regardless of occupation, suicide has become much more prevalent, the rate having climbed by around 40% over the past two decades. For farmers, as for most of the population, the stigma associated with mental health can prevent those who need help from seeking it.

The state is now trying to solve this problem with federal funding of half a million dollars for a mental health support program for farmers, through direct services such as counseling, as well as training on topics such as agricultural finance, peer support. networks and a free online resource library.

Seth Wilner, field specialist at UNH Cooperative Extension, worked with other organizations across the state to design the program.

He said efforts around farmer mental health started in earnest last year, with a $ 25,000 grant through the National Young Farmers Coalition.

“It’s really a response to the stressful conditions COVID has created: the pressures and bankruptcies of the dairy industry and the loss of dairy farms,” Wilner said.

Wilner estimates that two years ago there were about 120 dairy farms in the state. The number of farms still shipping milk is now around 85. And last month Horizon Organic announced it would end contracts with 89 organic dairies in the Northeast. While Wilner was only aware of two New Hampshire dairies that would be directly affected, he said the decision illustrates the fragility of the system.

He also points to extension studies on farmers’ profit margins, which range from around 3 percent to 7 to 10 percent “for the very good”.

“It’s a hell of a benchmark to overcome, in order to be able to make a living from farming,” he said. The challenge may be even greater for dairy farmers: the cost of producing milk is more than what producers can sell it for.

Last year’s initial grant of $ 25,000 was used to de-stigmatize mental health and educate the farming community about sources of stress. They looked at stressors affecting farmers related to business skills, succession planning, communication, family dynamics, legal pressures and bankruptcies.

Then, when the money became available through the American Rescue Plan Act in March, Wilner called the state Department of Agriculture, who agreed to apply for the funds, Wilner writing the grant and running the program. .

On Wednesday, the Executive Council approved the Department of Agriculture’s request for $ 500,000, which will fund four main initiatives, according to Wilner.

The current budget sets aside approximately $ 66,000 for education and awareness through print and radio advertising. About $ 200,000 will be spent on direct technical assistance, such as helping a farmer see a therapist or work with a financial advisor on tax planning, increasing profitability or managing bankruptcy.

Twenty thousand dollars will be used to create a resource library that will bring together relevant podcasts, tip sheets, articles and videos. Wilner said it will also include financial calculators that farmers can use to determine return on investment or on an asset. Finally, the program includes money for training and education. Details are not finalized, but Wilner said they plan to include topics such as communications with farm families, stress reduction methods, farm worker recruitment and retention, and financial record keeping. .

There are a handful of organizations around the state that are collaborating on the program, including the New Hampshire Farm Bureau Federation, which plans to set up peer support groups so farmers can seek and offer help.

“There have been big changes in farming over the years,” said Rob Johnson, policy director for the New Hampshire Farm Bureau Federation. “Dealing with technology alone can be difficult to manage. “

“It’s hard to admit that you need help,” Johnson said. He hopes the peer-to-peer system can help – and it’s a way for farmers to get paid to share their expertise with others who may be facing similar issues.

Some members of the farming community are skeptical of how much a program like this will actually help anyone who needs it.

Jameson Small, who works for the Refugee and Immigrant Success nonprofit that runs the New American Sustainable Agriculture program, said he doubts new Americans and migrant farm workers are included in this program. .

“My observation of COVID is that these new Americans [have been] totally left behind throughout the pandemic, ”Small said.

“In this state, the Agriculture Department is very focused – like the entire Agriculture Department – on commodities, like milk producers,” Small said. “Dairy farmers have been hit hard by COVID. “

Small said the focus too often leaves out others who are an important part of farming in the state. His work is aimed at helping new Americans gain access to land so they can farm and earn money so they don’t have to depend on benefits and services. Additionally, he said, many cultivate because tilling the land is therapeutic and they can cultivate culturally important crops. He said people come from Boston and New York to buy the types of corn that new American farmers are growing. His concern, he said, is that the new program focused on farmer mental health would do little for farmers who sell direct to the consumer.

Small said he was also interested in seeing how and if the money went to farm workers rather than just farm owners.

“You look at all the orchards in the state, and [in] most of the vegetable fields are colored people and most of the dairy barns. You know, they’re the ones that were the core workers that had to break their asses over the past couple of years and keep breaking their asses, and they’re struggling with mental health issues just as much as the guy in the office that owns the farm, ”Small said.

Wilner said the program aims to reach black, indigenous and colored farmers, and that they have hired a coordinator who will specifically address issues of diversity, equity and inclusion as the program rolls out. Rachel Freierman, a queer farmer who lives in the North Country, has already started educating underserved farmers with last year’s grant.

Still, Wilner admitted, there is a lot to be learned in this area.

“We don’t know the queer farming population of New Hampshire. We do not know the BIPOC farm population in New Hampshire. We don’t know the population of new American farmers, ”he said.

When asked if a program like this would help his farm, Robertson was cautious in his response. He paused for a long moment, not wanting to sound ungrateful. “All of this help is great,” he said, “but without commercial commodity farming being able to generate a profit, it doesn’t help much.”

The way Robertson sees it, it’s getting harder and harder to compete. Horizon Organic will be purchasing milk from the Midwest, and Robertson attributes that to a new method of pasteurization that allows the product a shelf life of months rather than weeks. Robertson also highlighted grants and tax credits in neighboring states of Maine, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

“I’m not saying that’s what we have to do, but I’m saying it’s really hard to compete,” he said. “Business plans and things like that are great, but if we don’t have a market for it, it doesn’t do us a lot of good. “

“Americans have a choice if they want local food: they have to pay more for it, and they have to step in and support it,” he said.

Still, he said, having mental health support is important. “It’s hard to get people to use it, but it’s really good to have it there for people to use it. “

If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HELLO to 741741.


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Children, families, teachers and providers can find answers to mental health issues at SimplyHealthyMinds.com https://ilfarodellavita.com/children-families-teachers-and-providers-can-find-answers-to-mental-health-issues-at-simplyhealthyminds-com/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/children-families-teachers-and-providers-can-find-answers-to-mental-health-issues-at-simplyhealthyminds-com/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 16:54:01 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/children-families-teachers-and-providers-can-find-answers-to-mental-health-issues-at-simplyhealthyminds-com/ Simply Healthcare has partnered with the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FCAAP) to launch an online toolkit of resources – www.SimplyHealthyMinds.com – to help communities overcome the mental health challenges facing children. The online toolkit is timely given the growing crisis of mental health issues in children. One in five children have […]]]>

Simply Healthcare has partnered with the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FCAAP) to launch an online toolkit of resources – www.SimplyHealthyMinds.com – to help communities overcome the mental health challenges facing children.

The online toolkit is timely given the growing crisis of mental health issues in children. One in five children have mental health problems. Half of people with diagnosable conditions do not seek help or treatment.

On SimplyHealthyMinds.com, users can find resources such as guidelines for parents to talk to teens, conversation starters for parents to talk with kids, journal entry prompts to help kids express their feelings, access to local community help programs, screening tools and suicide prevention hotline.

“Simply Healthcare is committed to supporting the overall health of Florida children – their physical, mental and emotional health,” said Holly prince, president of Simply Healthcare Medicaid Plan. “SimplyHealthyMinds.com will serve as a trusted source of mental health information and the programs available to help children and families overcome mental health issues and find appropriate treatment. We are delighted to partner with the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics in this important mission to improve the lives of those we are privileged to serve. “

The information on the website is organized by user so that children, adolescents, parents, health care providers, teachers, or others who interact with children can find the resources that are useful to them.

“There are real consequences when children who need support don’t have access to it,” said Dr. Lisa Gwynn, president of the Florida chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “That’s why we wanted to make it easier to find available resources and help Floridians meet the challenges of mental health issues in children. “

September marks Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. As Floridians seek resources to help them, they can trust the information, tools and activities at SimplyHealthyMinds.com. The content was curated by experts from Simply Healthcare and pediatricians from FCAAP.

The rise in mental health problems among children is in part due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the Jed Foundation report: Fluent Family Wellbeing Study, 60% of parents report that their children have experienced distress in the past year. Since the onset of COVID-19, Florida has seen a 30% increase in the Baker Acts – the act of hiring someone at a mental health treatment center – among children ages 12 to 17.

Mental health issues can affect many areas of children’s lives, including their happiness, physical health, and academic performance. Fortunately, Simply Healthcare and FCAAP recognize the growing need to support children with mental health challenges and have taken action to help them.

Visit SimplyHealthyMinds.com to find guidelines, best practices, and local programs.


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Mental health market would like to cross $ 537.97 million by 2030 https://ilfarodellavita.com/mental-health-market-would-like-to-cross-537-97-million-by-2030/ https://ilfarodellavita.com/mental-health-market-would-like-to-cross-537-97-million-by-2030/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 06:03:00 +0000 https://ilfarodellavita.com/mental-health-market-would-like-to-cross-537-97-million-by-2030/ Mental Health Some countries are investing in innovative digital services and by appointing more mental health professionals this will create a positive impact over the period. PORTLAND, OR, USA, September 20, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Mental health is a state of psychological well-being or the absence of any mental illness. It refers to the psychological level […]]]>

Mental Health

Some countries are investing in innovative digital services and by appointing more mental health professionals this will create a positive impact over the period.

PORTLAND, OR, USA, September 20, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Mental health is a state of psychological well-being or the absence of any mental illness. It refers to the psychological level of functioning of an individual at an appropriate level of behavioral and emotional adjustment. The disturbance or imbalance of this mental state results in the prevalence of disease or mental disorders. Mental illness can cause abnormal behavior and unusual thoughts and feelings over a period of time, which causes emotional or physical distress or impairment.

The mental health market size was valued at $ 383.31 million in 2020 and is expected to reach $ 537.97 million by 2030, growing at a CAGR of 3.5% from 2021 to 2030.

Click Here to Access Sample Report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/12135

North America was the largest shareholder in the global mental health market in 2020, due to its well-established health care infrastructure, increasing adoption of mental health services, increasing the geriatric population and the increasing prevalence of mental illnesses. However, Asia-Pacific is expected to register the highest CAGR during the forecast period, due to increased health awareness, health infrastructure development and increased number of hospitals equipped with state-of-the-art medical facilities.

The major factors contributing to the growth of the market include increasing funding by private and government organizations for mental health treatment and increasing areas of service for mental disorders. The rise in awareness of the benefits associated with telehealth and telepsychiatry, particularly in developed countries, is driving key investments directed to these platforms. However, increasing cost of mental health and addiction programs is expected to hamper the growth of the market. Conversely, unmet medical needs in emerging countries are expected to provide a lucrative opportunity in the mental health market.

On the basis of the disorder, the global mental health market is divided into Schizophrenia, Alcohol Use Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Depression, Anxiety, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Substance Abuse Disorder, Substance Abuse Disorder diet and other disorders. The depression segment was the main contributor to revenue in 2020 and is expected to remain dominant during the forecast period. This is attributed to the growing number of cases of anxiety, depression and suicide which have heightened concerns about mental health around the world.

By services, the global mental health market is divided into emergency mental health services, outpatient counseling, home treatment services, inpatient treatment services, and other services. The inpatient hospital treatment services segment dominated the market in 2020 and is expected to continue this trend during the forecast period. This is attributed to the increase in the incidence of mental illnesses, the increase in the number of patients and the large number of patients who are deploying mental health solutions to improve personal care.

According to the age group, the global mental health market is separated into pediatrics, adult and geriatrics. The adult segment dominated the market in 2020 and is expected to maintain its lead during the forecast period.

Main conclusions of the study
• By disorder, the depression segment was the largest contributor to the mental health market in 2020.
• By services, inpatient treatment services were the largest contributor to the mental health market in 2020.
• By age group, the adult segment is expected to grow at a significant CAGR of 3.9% from 2021 to 2030.
• By region, North America generated the largest share of revenue in 2020, while Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the review period.

Access the full report: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/mental-health-market-A11770

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